Humanitarian Engineering Courses

Nature and Human Values (NHV):

NHV is a core curriculum course for all CSM freshman. It includes a week long introduction to humanitarian engineering. Topics covered during this module include:

* Roles of Humanitarian Engineers in society
* Promises of Humanitarian Engineering in the developing world

Click here for the NHV course webpage.
 

Technical Electives:

Technical Electives in Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil Engineering:

* EGGN 353 - Fundamentals of Environmental Science and Engineering I: Topics covered include: history of water and related environmental law and regulation, major sources and concerns of water pollution, water quality parameters and their measurement, material and energy balances, water chemistry concepts, microbial concepts, aquatic toxicology and risk assessment. Prerequisites: MACS213/223. Course Website

* EGGN 354- Fundamentals of Environmental Science and Engineering II: Topics covered include: history of environmental law and regulation (air and soil), major sources and concerns of air and soil pollution, soil science concepts, air science concepts, mass and energy balances (air and soil), environmental quality of air and soil (physical, chemical and microbiological parameters), air and soil toxicology and risk assessment. Prerequisites: MACS213/223.

* EGGN 453 - Wastewater Engineering: Analysis and design of primary, secondary and advanced wastewater treatment systems. Includes analysis of nutrient and toxic removal and residual issues. Also includes the design of collection systems and pump stations. Regulatory analysis under the Clean Water Act (CWA). Prerequisite: EGGN353. Course Website


* EGGN 454 - Water Supply Engineering: Water supply availability and quality. Theory and design of conventional potable water treatment unit processes. Design of distribution systems. Also includes regulatory analysis under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Prerequisite: EGGN353.

* EGGN498 - Practical Design of Small Renewable Energy Systems: This course has been designed to cover practical topics related to the design of alternative energy based systems. One of the main objectives of this course is to focus on the interdisciplinary aspects of integration of the alternative sources of energy, including hydropower, wind power, photovoltaic, gas, biomass and energy storage for those systems. Power electronic systems will be discussed and how inverters can be used for stand-alone and grid-connected electrical energy applications. SyllabusPDF versionText only version

* EGGN 498 - Control Systems Applications: This course has been designed to develop a working knowledge of engineering practice in the area of automation and control systems design and implementation. The course objective is to bridge the gap between control systems theory and control systems practice. The importance of automation, control and instrumentation to the industrial processes is universal; this course will introduce the student to the three operations of control: measurement, manipulation, and control. The focus of the course will be Process Control, Analysis and Design. SyllabusPDF versionText only version


* EGGN 498/598 - Understanding Landslides: An introduction to occurrence of landslides, their worldwide distributions, their triggering mechanisms, their investigation and remediation, and their socioeconomic impacts. SyllabusPDF versionText only version


* EGGN 498 - Timber and Masonry Design with Applications to "Unconventional" Materials: Students will develop an understanding of the basic engineering properties of timber and masonry materials and become familiar with design methods and philosophies for timber and masonry structures. They will apply this knowledge to the design and analysis of structures constructed with “unconventional” materials (adobe, timber pole, bamboo) such as those used in constructing structures in developing countries. SyllabusPDF versionText only version

* EGGN 498/598D - Groundwater Mapping: This course investigates the physical properties of groundwater, contaminants, and surrounding media. Survey tools, including electrical, electromagnetic, radar, seismic methods to map groundwater and contamination will be discussed. For each tool, field parameters, cost, depth of penetration, accuracy, and interpretation limitations will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on how measurements are made and not on the underlying theory of each method. Special consideration will be given to planning and carrying out these surveys in remote or economically disadvantaged regions.

* EGGN 490 - Sustainable Engineering Design: A comprehensive introduction into concept of sustainability from an engineering point of view will be presented. This course will involve the integration of engineering and statistical analysis through a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) tool called SimaPro. Using this tool will allow quantitative consideration of the environmental and health impacts. Social implications will also be an important consideration. SyllabusPDF versionText only version (PDF)

* EGES 498A - Onsite Water Reclamation and Reuse: Please see the Environmental Science and Engineering for more information on this course.

Technical Electives in Bioengineering: (see your Humanitarian Studies advisor for a complete list of Bioengineering courses)

* BELS 420 / EGGN 420 - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (I): The application of engineering principles and techniques to the human body presents many unique challenges. Biomedical Engineering is a diverse, seemingly all-encompassing field that includes such areas as biomechanics, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, rehabilitation. This course is intended to provide an introduction to, and overview of, Biomedical Engineering .Prerequisites: DCGN241, DCGN381, EGGN320, EGGN351 (co-requisite or instructor permission). Course Website


* BELS 425 / EGGN 425 - Musculoskeletal Biomechanics (II): This course is intended to provide engineering students with an introduction to musculoskeletal biomechanics. At the end of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the special considerations necessary to apply engineering principles to the human body. The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since understanding injury will require developing an understanding of normal biomechanics. Prerequisites: DCGN241, EGGN320, EGGN420 (or instructor permission). Course Website


* BELS 430 / EGGN 430 - Biomedical Instrumentation (II): The acquisition, processing, and interpretation of biological signals presents many unique challenges to the Biomedical Engineer. This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to, and appreciation for, many of these challenges. At the end of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the special considerations necessary to gathering and analyzing biological signal data. Prerequisites: EGGN250, DCGN381, BELS420/EGGN420 (or permission of instructor). Course Website


* BELS 398A / 598A - Bioengineering Seminar Series: Course Website

 

Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS) Courses:

LAIS Core Courses:

* LAIS 320 (previously LIHU 325) - Introduction to Ethics:  A general introduction to ethics that explores its analytic and historical traditions. Reference will commonly be made to one or more significant texts by such moral philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Kant, John Stuart Mill, and others. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 321 (previously LIHU 326) - Political Philosophy and Engineering: A critical exploration of how engineering may be related to different philosophies of the common good. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 402 (previously LICM 400) - Writing Proposals for a Better World: This course develops student's writing and higher-order thinking skills and helps meet the needs of underserved populations, particularly via funding proposals written for nonprofit organizations. Prequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN 200.


* LAIS 449 (previously LISS 432) - Cultural Dynamics of Global Development: Role of cultures and nuances in world development; cultural relationship between the developed North and the developing South, specifically between the U.S. and the Third World. Prequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN 200.


* LAIS 475 (previously LIHU 363) - Engineering Cultures in the Developing World: An investigation and assessment of engineering problem solving in the developing world using historical and cultural cases. Countries to be included range across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 476 (previously LIHU 460) - Technology and International Development: An historical examination of the role of technology in humanitarian and social improvement projects. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Corequisite: SYGN 200.


* LAIS 498E - Humanitarian Engineering: Please see the LAIS website for more information on this course.

* LAIS 498M - African Crisis: Please see the LAIS website for more information on this course.

LAIS Area Studies Tracks:

o United States Track:

* LAIS 285 (previously LISS 375) - Introduction to Law and Legal Systems: Examination of different approaches to, principles of, and issues in the law in the U.S. and other societies. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 485 (previously LISS 474) - Constitutional Law and Politics: This course presents a comprehensive survey of the U.S. Constitution with special attention devoted to the first ten Amendments, also known as the Bill of Rights. Since the Constitution is primarily a legal document, the class will adopt a legal approach to constitutional interpretation. However, as the historical and political context of constitutional interpretation is inseparable from the legal analysis, these areas will also be covered. Significant current developments in constitutional jurisprudence will also be examined. The first part of the course deals with Articles I through III of the Constitution, which specify the division of national governmental power among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. Additionally, the federal nature of the American governmental system, in which governmental authority is apportioned between the national government and the state governments, will be studied. The second part of the course examines the individual rights specifically protected by the amendments to the Constitution, principally the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 487 (previously LISS 480) - Environmental Politics and Policy: Seminar on environmental policies and the political and governmental processes that produce them. Group discussion and independent research on specific environmental issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.


* LAIS 488 (previously LISS 482) - Water Politics and Policy: Seminar on water policies and the political and governmental processes that produce them, as an exemplar of natural resource politics and policy in general. Group discussion and independent research on specific politics and policy issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

o Latin America Track:

* LAIS 335 (previously LISS 340) - International Political Economy of Latin America: A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state and economy in Latin America as seen through an examination of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics of interstate relationships between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 435 (previously LISS 440) - Latin American Development: A senior seminar designed to explore the political economy of current and recent past development strategies, models, efforts, and issues in Latin America, one of the most dynamic regions of the world today. Development is understood to be a nonlinear, complex set of processes involving political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors whose ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life for individuals. The role of both the state and the market in development processes will be examined. Topics to be covered will vary as changing realities dictate but will be drawn from such subjects as inequality of income distribution; the role of education and health care; regionmarkets; the impact of globalization; institution-building; corporate-community-state interfaces; neoliberalism; privatization; democracy; and public policy formulation as it relates to development goals. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 436 (previously LISS 441) - Hemispheric Integration of the Americas: This international political economy seminar is designed to accompany the endeavor now under way in the Americas to create a free trade area for the entire Western Hemisphere. Integrating this hemisphere, however, is not just restricted to the mechanics of facilitating trade but also engages a host of other economic, political, social, cultural, and environmental issues, which will also be treated in this course. If the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) becomes a reality, it will be the largest regionmarket in the world with some 800 million people and a combined GNP of over US $10 trillion. In the three other main languages of the Americas, the FTAA is know as the Area de Libre Comercio de las Americas (ALCA) (Spanish), the Area de Livre Comercio das Americas (ALCA) (Portuguese), and the Zone de libre echange des Ameriques (ZLEA) (French). Negotiations for the FTAA/ALCA/ZLEA are to be concluded by 2005. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.


* LAIS 487 (previously LISS 480) - Environmental Politics and Policy: Seminar on environmental policies and the political and governmental processes that produce them. Group discussion and independent research on specific environmental issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.


* LAIS 452 (previously LISS 437) - Corruption and Development: This course addresses the problem of corruption and its impact on development. Readings are multidisciplinary and include policy studies, economics, and political science. Students will acquire an understanding of what constitutes corruption, how it negatively affects development, and what they, as engineers in a variety of professional circumstances, might do in circumstances in which bribe paying or bribe taking might occur. Prereqisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequeiste or corequisite: SYGN 200.

o Asian Track:

* LAIS 337 (previously LISS 342) - International Political Economy of Asia: A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state and economy in East and Southeast Asia as seen through an examination of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics of interstate relationships between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 437 (previously LISS 442) - Asian Development: This international political economy seminar deals with the historical development of Asia Pacific from agrarian to post-industrial eras; its economic, political, and cultural transformation since World War II, contemporary security issues that both divide and unite the region; and globalization processes that encourage Asia Pacific to forge a single trading bloc. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 452 (previously LISS 437) - Corruption and Development: This course addresses the problem of corruption and its impact on development. Readings are multidisciplinary and include policy studies, economics, and political science. Students will acquire an understanding of what constitutes corruption, how it negatively affects development, and what they, as engineers in a variety of professional circumstances, might do in circumstances in which bribe paying or bribe taking might occur. Prereqisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequeiste or corequisite: SYGN 200.

o Africa and Middle East Track:

* LAIS 339 (previously LISS 344) - International Political Economy of the Middle East: A broad survey of the interrelationships between the state and market in the Middle East as seen through an examination of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.

* LAIS 341 (previously LISS 346) - International Political Economy of Africa: A broad survey of the interrelationships between the state and market I Africa as seen through an examination of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape policy, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN 200.

* LAIS 452 (previously LISS 437) - Corruption and Development: This course addresses the problem of corruption and its impact on development. Readings are multidisciplinary and include policy studies, economics, and political science. Students will acquire an understanding of what constitutes corruption, how it negatively affects development, and what they, as engineers in a variety of professional circumstances, might do in circumstances in which bribe paying or bribe taking might occur. Prereqisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequeiste or corequisite: SYGN 200.

 

 Economics and Business Course Descriptions:

* EBGN 310 - Environmental and Resource Economics: Application of microeconomic theory to topics in environmental and resource economics. Topics include analysis of pollution control, benefit/cost analysis in decision-making and the associated problems of measuring benefits and costs, non-renewable resource extraction, measures of resource scarcity, renewable resource management, environmental justice, sustainability, and the analysis of environmental regulations and resource policies. Prerequisite: EBGN201 or EBGN311.

* EBGN 321 - Engineering Economics: Time value of money concepts of present worth, future worth, annual worth, rate of return and break-even analysis applied to after-tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments. Related topics on proper handling of (1) inflation and escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk adjustment of analyses using expected value concepts, (4) mutually exclusive alternative analyses and service producing alternatives.

* EBGN 330 - Energy Economics: Study of economic theories of optimal resource extraction, market power, market failure, regulation, deregulation, technological change and resource scarcity. Economic tools used to analyze OPEC, energy mergers, natural gas price controls and deregulation, electric utility restructuring, energy taxes, environmental impacts of energy use, government R&D programs, and other energy topics. Prerequisite: EBGN201 or EBGN311.


* EBGN 342 - Economic Development: Theories of development and underdevelopment. Sectoral development policies and industrialization. The special problems and opportunities created by an extensive mineral endowment, including the Dutch disease and the resource-curse argument. The effect of value-added processing and export diversification on development.

 

Multidisciplinary Engineering Lab Course Descriptions:

* EGGN 250 - Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory I: Laboratory experiments integrating instrumentation, circuits and power with computer data acquisition and sensors. Sensor data is used to transition between science and engineering science. Engineering science issues like stress, strains, thermal conductivity, pressure and flow are investigated using fundamentals of equilibrium, continuity, and conservation. Prerequisite or corequisite: DCGN381. Course Website

* EGGN 350 - Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory II: Laboratory experiments integrating electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, stress analysis, and other engineering fundamentals using computer data acquisition and transducers. Fluid mechanics issues like compressible and incompressible fluid flow (mass and volumetric), pressure losses, pump characteristics, pipe networks, turbulent and laminar flow, cavitation, drag, and others are covered. Experimental stress analysis issues like compression and tensile testing, strain gage installation, Young's Modulus, stress vs. strain diagrams, and others are covered. Experimental stress analysis and fluid mechanics are integrated in experiments that merge fluid power of the testing machine with applied stress and displacement of material specimen. Prerequisite: DCGN381 and EGGN250. Prerequisite or corequisite: EGGN320 and EGGN351. Course Website

 

Senior Design Course Descriptions:

Eligibility
For eligibility to participate in this Program in Senior Capstone Engineering Design, subscribers must be Engineering Division seniors at the Colorado School of Mines who intend to complete their Bachelor's Degrees in Engineering at CSM within two semesters. Eligible subscribers must also satisfy the EGGN491 course prerequisite requirements stipulated in the Colorado School of Mines Bulletin. Any queries on eligibility status must be brought to the immediate attention of the course coordinator.

* EGGN 491 and EGGN492 - Senior Design I and Senior Design II:
The CSM Engineering Division Capstone Design Course is a creative multidisciplinary design experience emerging from combined efforts in civil, electrical, mechanical, and environmental specialties in engineering. Within the engineering community it is widely believed that many of the challenges which are facing practicing engineers, now and in the 21st century, can best be met by exploiting multidisciplinary approaches. This Program in Senior Capstone Engineering Design has been established to demonstrate the value and ingenuity which can be derived from cooperative design efforts among traditional engineering disciplines.

The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) defines engineering design:

"Engineering design is the process of devising a system, component or process to meet desired needs. It is a decision-making process (often iterative), in which the basic sciences, mathematics, and engineering sciences are applied to convert resources optimally to meet a stated objective. Among fundamental elements of the design process are the establishment of objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, construction, testing and evaluation."

This course has been designed to comply with the ABET guidelines that require the engineering design component of a curriculum to include at least some of the following features:
o development of student creativity
o use of open-ended problems
o development and use of design methodology
o formulation of design problem statements and specifications
o consideration of alternative solutions
o feasibility considerations
o detailed system descriptions

Further, it is essential to include a variety of realistic constraints such as:
o economic factors
o safety
o reliability
o aesthetics
o ethics
o social impact

This Program is therefore seeking designs and proposals to construct, test, and evaluate a product or system. The construction and test phases will follow in the EGGN 492 course during the following semester. The major deliverable for the first semester is a design report or proposal that includes a complete design description with construction and test plan; including estimated costs (budget), assembly and component drawings where appropriate, engineering calculations to demonstrate that a factor of safety has been employed, a schedule and indication of the division of labor among the project team members.

 

Foreign Languages Course Descriptions:

Click here for descriptions of courses in Foreign Languages.

 

McBride Honors Program Course Descriptions:

Click here for descriptions of courses in the McBride Honors Program (clicking on any course will bring up a list of courses).

 

Future Courses:

Check back later for information about upcoming course topics such as small hydroelectric design, pollutant transport in soils, image analysis for disaster relief and bioengineering design for the handicapped.

 

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Last Updated: 07/28/2017 16:11:07