Affiliated Faculty

Linda Battalora

Linda Battalora

Teaching Professor, Petroleum Engineering

Alderson Hall 225
303.273.3903
lbattalo@mines.edu

Linda Battalora is a Teaching Professor in the Petroleum Engineering Department and a Shultz Humanitarian Engineering Fellow.  She has BS and MS degrees in Petroleum Engineering from Mines, a JD from Loyola University New Orleans School of Law, and a PhD in Environmental Science and Engineering from Mines.  Prior to joining the Faculty at Mines, Linda served in various roles in the oil and gas industry including operations engineer, production engineer, attorney, and international negotiator for oil and gas project development.  She teaches Properties of Reservoir Fluids, Petroleum Seminar, Field Session, Environmental Law and courses in the Leadership in Social Responsibility, Humanitarian Engineering, Energy, and Midstream Minor programs.

Linda is an active member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Social Responsibility (HSSE-SR) Advisory Committee and is the Chair of the Sustainable Development Technical Section Steering Committee. Her research areas include HSSE-SR, Sustainable Development, and Community Health. She is the recipient of the 2015 SPE Rocky Mountain North America Region Award for distinguished achievement by Petroleum Engineering Faculty and the 2014 Rocky Mountain North America Region Award for distinguished contribution to Petroleum Engineering in Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Social Responsibility.

David Frossard

David Frossard

Peace Corps Prep Coordinator

303.273.3449
dfrossar@mines.edu

David Frossard is the Peace Corp Prep coordinator and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines from 1985 to 1987. His experiences there led to a PhD in anthropology from the University of California at Irvine, focusing on sustainable community development theory and practice. After a post-doctoral fellowship at the East-West Center in Honolulu, Hawaii, he joined the Mines faculty in 1995. Since then Frossard has taught classes for LAIS (now HASS), Humanitarian Engineering, and the McBride Honors Program. He has lived or conducted research in almost two dozen countries, including Zambia where he and his wife, Ginny Lee, worked as Peace Corps volunteers from 2003 to 2005. Since returning to Mines in 2006, Frossard has served as faculty advisor for a number of student organizations including Mines Without Borders and has helped lead Mines students on fact-finding or service-learning excursions to China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Mongolia, and Nepal. He is the Peace Corps Prep co-coordinator on campus.

Joel Hartter

Joel Hartter

Associate Professor, University of Colorado


joel.hartter@colorado.edu

Joel is a geographer who specializes in human dimensions of global change. He brings this expertise to the HE team’s ongoing research project in artisanal gold mining in Colombia and Peru. He joined the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Colorado as an associate professor in 2014 after working as an assistant/associate professor at the University of New Hampshire for 6 ½ years. His research program focuses on human behavior, land use/land cover change, population change and migration, conservation and protected area management, and human health. He has active projects in East and Southern Africa, Madagascar, South America, and the Inland Northwest of the US. Joel is also the faculty director for the Masters of the Environment professional graduate degree program. Joel holds a PhD in Geography from the University of Florida, MS in Forest Engineering from Oregon State University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan. You can learn more about his work here and can reach him at joel.hartter@colorado.edu.

Katie Johnson

Katie Johnson

Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering

Brown Building 327F
303.273.3914
kjohnson@mines.edu

Katie Johnson is Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering. Her research interests are in control systems with applications to wind energy and engineering education. Her funded research projects include increasing the energy capture of wind farms using coordinated turbine control, design of a control system for a 50-MW Segmented Ultralight Morphing Rotor (SUMR), and an investigation of the opportunities and barriers for integrating social justice concepts into an introductory control systems class. She is a Joint Appointee at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s National Wind Technology Center.

John Leydens

John Leydens

Associate Professor, Humanities, Arts, & Social Studies

Stratton Hall 420
303.273.3180
jleydens@mines.edu

Jon Leydens is Associate Professor in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. His research focuses on engineering education and communication, including the role of listening in engineering and sustainable community development contexts (Leydens and Lucena, 2009; Lucena, Schneider, and Leydens, 2010). He is co-author of Engineering and Sustainable Community Development (2010), which among other foci accentuated the need for engineers working in community development projects to listen to local community members’ needs and perspectives. His forthcoming book from Wiley-IEEE Press (with co-author Juan Lucena) fills a gap in our understanding of how engineering and social justice can align.

Junko Munakata Marr

Junko Munakata Marr

Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering

Coolbaugh Hall
303.273.3421
junko@mines.edu

Junko Munakata Marr is Associate Professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and a Shultz Family Humanitarian Engineering Fellow. Current research investigations include an energy-positive hybrid anaerobic baffled reactor to achieve secondary treatment standards for domestic wastewater, microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation to stabilize soil, and membrane-based bioreactors for biopolymer production. Her research group applies molecular biology techniques to characterize microbial communities in environmentally relevant systems. She is also involved in programs supporting research experiences for undergraduates and conducts engineering education research to evaluate the effectiveness of various classroom interventions.

Carrie McClelland

Carrie McClelland

Associate Professor, Petroleum Engineering

303.273.3367
cmcclell@mines.edu

Carrie McClelland joined the Petroleum Engineering Department in 2010 as an adjunct professor, and became a full-time member of the faculty in 2012. She teaches fluid mechanics, multidisciplinary design, and the senior professionalism seminar. She holds degrees in civil and environmental engineering, as well as a graduate certificate in Engineering for Developing Communities from the Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities and a graduate minor in college teaching. Her research interests include engineering education, teaching pedagogy, water reuse, and resource management. Carrie is a licensed professional engineer with experience in construction of petrochemical facilities, project management, site and concrete work,  stream restoration, and bridge and culvert hydraulics and hydrology. She is an active member of SPE, Pi Epsilon Tau, and the American Society of Engineering Education.

Juan Fernando Pacheco Duarte

Juan Fernando Pacheco Duarte

Director, Social Innovation Science Park, Universidad Minuto de Dios, Colombia

jpacheco@uniminuto.edu

Juan Fernando Pacheco Duarte is the director of the Parque Científico de Innovación Social at the Universidad Minuto de Dios, Colombia. His work focuses on facilitating the creation of innovative solutions among researchers and vulnerable communities. He leads the social innovation components of the HE team’s artisanal mining project in Colombia. He is especially interested in Green Community Businesses and Humanitarian Engineering. He is co-founder of the group Ingenieros Sin Fronteras – Colombia and also dedicates part of his time to work with UNICEF on Mine Risk Education.

Juan obtained a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering and a master’s degree in Planning and Administration of Regional Development at the Universidad de los Andes, Colombia. His academic experience focuses on knowledge management and formulation and evaluation of social projects. Additionally, he has dedicated part of his time to academic management; at the Universidad Minuto de Dios he has been Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Academic Vice Chancellor and Rector of one of its headquarters in Colombia.

Oscar Jaime Restrepo Baena

Oscar Jaime Restrepo Baena

Professor, Department of Materials and Minerals of the School of Mines, Universidad Nacional de Colombia

ojrestre@unal.edu.co

Oscar Jaime Restrepo Baena obtained the degree of Mining and Metallurgy Engineer in the School of Mines at Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin. He is the project lead for the HE team’s artisanal mining community engagement in Colombia. He completed the MSc. in Environmental Impact Assessment and the Ph.D. in Metallurgy and Materials at the Universidad de Oviedo, Spain. He completed a post-doctoral stay in the R & D laboratory of the Nubiola Company in Barcelona, ​​Spain, where he also served as director of Research and Development. He is linked as a Professor in the Department of Materials and Minerals of the School of Mines at Universidad Nacional de Colombia and is a member of the Minerals Institute – CIMEX, where he participates in research projects and he is the head of research in the area of ​​Extractive Metallurgy: Physical-chemical processes associated with the metallurgical industry and coordinator of the Sustainability group in extractive industries. He is part of the Cement and Building Materials Group or Research, classified A1 by Colciencias. He is the author of numerous scientific and academic articles in the area of ​​extractive metallurgy, sustainability in mining and ceramic materials published in high impact international journals, and he has been director of research projects developed with national and international funding. He has directed doctoral, masters and undergraduate thesis carried out in the School of Mines. In the administrative area he has been Director of the Curriculum Department of Materials and Bioengineering and Director of the Dyna Magazine. It is part of scientific societies such as SME / TMS / SOMP / ACM / AIST / Riprexs / SAI.

Jeffrey Shragge

Jeffrey Shragge

Assistant Professor, Geophysics

jshragge@mines.edu

Jeffrey Shragge is an Associate Professor in the Geophysics Department and a co-PI of the Center for Wave Phenomena at the Colorado School of Mines.  Over the previous decade, Jeffrey has been an active participant in a number of different activities related to Humanitarian Geophysics and Geoscience Education.  He has been an instructor and/or organizer of a number of teaching geophysical field camps in Romania, Thailand and Kenya that have been sponsored by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the Geoscientists without Borders (GWB) organizations.  Humanitarian Geophysics activities include projects based on securing new groundwater resources (Kenya), handling environmental pollution due to acid mine drainage (Romania), investigating seismic hazards (Thailand), and helping to secure cultural heritage and archaeological sites (Mexico, Thailand and Western Australia).  Jeffrey currently serves as the Chair of the SEG’s Committee on University and Student Programs and on the SEG’s Field Camp Committee.

Nicole Smith

Nicole Smith

Assistant Professor, Mining Engineering

Brown Hall 213
303.273.3634
nmsmith@mines.edu

Nicole Smith was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Mining Engineering Department at the Colorado School of Mines in January 2017. She holds a PhD in Anthropology and a certificate in Development Studies from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interest include the following: artisanal and small-scale mining; mining, sustainability, and social responsibility; rural livelihoods and mining developments; indigenous peoples; community development; and engineering education. Prior to her position in the Mining Engineering Department, she was a Shultz Post-Doctoral Scholar in the Humanitarian Engineering Program at Mines. She has also held a position as a research fellow at the Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining at the Sustainable Minerals Institute at the University of Queensland. Her work there focused on health and safety in artisanal and small-scale mining.

Kate Smits

Kate Smits

Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering

ksmits@mines.edu

Kathleen (Kate) Smits is Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and a Shultz Family Humanitarian Engineering Fellow. Her research focuses on advancing the knowledge of shallow subsurface multiphase process affected by heat and mass flux dynamics at the land/atmospheric interfaces at a wide range of physical scales. The basic aim of Kate’s research is to combine theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches to address hydrological processes occurring near the earth’s surface as influenced by natural boundary conditions (e.g. humidity, temperature, radiation, wind, vegetation). The motivation of her research is to provide answers to questions of importance to many current and emerging water resources, hydrology, environmental and climate change related problems. For HE, she teaches courses in site remediation.